Art Carney

Izzy and Moe - Jackie Gleason - Art Carney - ... are federal agents during Prohibition , where the laughs fly as fast as the bullets - DVD

Izzy and Moe

Plot Synopsis of  Izzy and Moe, starring  Jackie Gleason  and  Art Carney

This is the film based on the true adventures of Izzy and Moe. They were two retired vaudeville performers who, being unemployed, decide to become prohibition enforcement agents. They are initially treated with scorn from fellow agents as old men pretending to be cops. That abuse soon stops when the pair refuse to use the standard but futile methods of the agency.  Instead, they employ their theatrical experience to use an amazing variety of disguises and tricks.  They become two of the most effective agents in the force. (more…)

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Art Carney as drunkenSanta Claus in the Twilight Zone episode, Night of the Meek

The Night of the Meek – Art Carney – Twilight Zone

I’ve been a long-time fan of the original  Twilight Zone series – this episode is an excellent example of why.   Something that Rod Serling tended to do multiple times throughout the series was to take a comedian/clown, and puts him in an unusual, dramatic role, to a great result.   The first time that he did this was with Ed Wynn in the second episode for the Twilight Zone,  One for the Angels.   Here, he does it in The Night of the Meek with  Art Carney in the role of Henry Corwin, with another wonderful performance in a wonderful story. (more…)

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cover of Art Carney - A Biography by Michael Seth Starr

Art Carney biography – best known as Ed Norton on The Honeymooners

cover of Art Carney - A Biography by Michael Seth StarrArt Carney biography (November 4, 1918 – November 9, 2003)

“A sewer worker is like a brain surgeon. We’re both specialists.” – Ed Norton, sewer connoisseur, played by Art Carney. Art Carney first became world famous playing the part of Ed Norton, sewer worker and best friend (and comic foil) to  Jackie Gleason‘s Ralph Kramden on the 1950’s TV sitcom “The Honeymooners” — but his story began much earlier. (more…)

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